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  #91  
Old 31-10-20, 09:11
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Here are the sisters, Margaret and Mary Grady, later to become Margaret Morphew and Mary Foster, in 1851:

https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageview...E&pId=10027451

Loving the mmn!!

GRADY, MARY mmn STENTION
GRO Reference: 1846 M Quarter in KINGSTON UPON HULL Volume 22 Page 448

GRADY, MARGARET mmn STENTION
GRO Reference: 1851 J Quarter in LOUTH UNION Volume 14 Page 539
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Old 31-10-20, 09:27
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Marriages Sep 1843
BORKWOOD Robert Mowson Louth 14 648
Collis Elizabeth Catherine Louth 14 648
GRADY John Louth 14 648 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
PEACOCK William Louth 14 648
RENISON Mary Louth 14 648
STENTION Mary Louth 14 648 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
TUXWORTH Mary Ann Louth 14 648
WHITE Samuel Louth 14 648

So, here in 1841 (bottom left) we have the Stinson family (or however you would care to spell it!)

https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageview...rn&pId=6793007

we have Ann, who becomes Mrs Campbell and then Mrs Toole and is the mother of Kate Campbell/Creesey and grandmother of Margaret Creesey.

and we have Mary who becomes Mrs Grady, mother of Mary Grady/Foster

The family very likely had a daughter Margaret who became Mrs Kennedy, but as she was aged about 36 in 1861 she would probably have been about 16 in 1841 and living/staying apart from her parents.
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  #93  
Old 31-10-20, 09:48
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Amazing!

This is like a conjuror's trick: look at George and ignore Mary.

I was lying in bed this morning, thinking that Leo (thank goodness he has unusual names!) must be the key.
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  #94  
Old 31-10-20, 10:01
BlueCrane BlueCrane is offline
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Goodness, what aan amazing amount of information you have all dug up in your efforts to help me. There is so much that I am afraid that somehwe along the line I have lost the thread, but I am sure you will unravel it for me. Yesterday evening I found the connection Morphew, Grady, Foster, but got no further. It is perhaps an intersting point that in a number of national newspapers in 1903 (amongst others Shetland News 05.09.1903 and Shroud News and Gloucestershire Advertiser 04.09.1903) there are reports on one of Maggie's cycling feats reporting that Maggie was paced by her BROTHER G. Foster.
Merry I am afraid you have "lost your pound" Maggie and Eberhart were married on 17.08.1907.
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Old 31-10-20, 10:19
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No, not that marriage - I meant the one between WDC and Kate Campbell - would it be before or after the birth of Margaret, supposedly on Valentine's day 1876. Though if she didn't know her dob exactly, Valentine's day would be a good date to choose!

Very interesting that George aliased as Maggie's brother!
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  #96  
Old 31-10-20, 10:21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
Amazing!

This is like a conjuror's trick: look at George and ignore Mary.

I was lying in bed this morning, thinking that Leo (thank goodness he has unusual names!) must be the key.

Yes, but when I looked at him in 1891 his first name was Geo not Leo!! Then I couldn't find him, obviously, and then I gave up! And why didn't you tell me his first name was Ignatius?!
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  #97  
Old 31-10-20, 10:39
BlueCrane BlueCrane is offline
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Sorry Merry, I obviously got things wrong with the wedding! However, I must just add one thing. Was Valentines Day a special date all those years ago? Elsewhere during the course of my researches I was told that prior to 1911 "sister-in-law" was also used for what we would call "step sister". Does that help or just confuse the issue even further.?
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Old 31-10-20, 10:47
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I agree about sister-in-law etc - All the "in-law" relationships covered more possibilities than today. Conversly, sister could also mean sister-in-law etc etc. And of course people also sometimes deliberately lied!

As for Valentine's day - we only know she had chosen this date by 1939 (or, of course, it might be the correct date!).

I know my rather flirtatious grandmother (b 1892) knew all about Valentine's day when she was young! I just googled Valentine's Day Cards history:

Quote:
The first Valentine’s cards

The first Valentine’s cards were sent in the 18th century. Initially these were handmade efforts, as pre-made cards were not yet available. Lovers would decorate paper with romantic symbols including flowers and love knots, often including puzzles and lines of poetry. Those who were less inspired could buy volumes that offered guidance on selecting the appropriate words and images to woo their lover. These cards were then slipped secretly under a door, or tied to a door-knocker.

It was in Georgian Britain that pre-printed cards first began to appear, though these were not yet as popular as they were eventually to become. Perhaps the oldest surviving example dates from 1797: this card, held at York Castle Museum, was sent by one Catherine Mossday to a Mr Brown of London. It is decorated with flowers and images of Cupid, with a verse printed around the border.
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"Something has been filled in that I didn't know was blank" Matthew Broderick WDYTYA? March 2010
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Old 31-10-20, 10:55
BlueCrane BlueCrane is offline
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Thanks Merry, That is really interesting, I always thought the Americans were responsible for the Valentines' Day cards. In the course of the postings the 1939 Registry has cropped up. Can you enlighten me what it is and where I can find it?
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  #100  
Old 31-10-20, 11:09
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The 1939 Register is available through FMP and Ancestry. This is Ancestry's version:

Margaret Finepel!!

https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageview...9b&pId=6178930
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